Posts tagged ‘portobello mushrooms’

June 6, 2011

All-Occasion Crepes

Last week, seeing as we had the panini grill out (admittedly an odd graduation present but one which has proved extremely useful) S decided to make crepes for dinner.  Then, since there was batter left over, she went ahead and made crepes for dessert.  Then, since there was still some batter left over, I made crepes the following morning for breakfast.  There is certainly nothing like starting the day out with an asparagus and arugula crepe.

The batter recipe is from Mark Bittman’s How To Cook Everything Vegetarian.

So, for dinner we had this:

That is, finely chopped portobello mushrooms, cured and green garlic, chives, arugula, ramps, local rosemary-fig goat cheese, and a drizzle of heavy cream.

Then for dessert this:

Raspberry jam, nutella, heavy cream.

Then breakfast (sorry, at 7:45am  I don’t take pictures):

Asparagus, chives, green garlic, arugula, salt and plenty of pepper.

Recipe for Batter:

Whisk together a cup of all-purpose flour, a pinch of salt, 1 tablespoon sugar, two eggs, and 1 and 1/4 cups milk, in a blender if you’ve got one (we don’t). If  it’s not pourable, mix in a little more milk.

Let it sit in the fridge for an hour. It can be used for up to 24 hours, if you are the kind of person who would prep a meal a day in advance (if you also iron your socks, seek help!)

When you’re all ready to crepe, put an 8-10 inch non-stick skillet on medium heat, and wait a few minutes before adding a pat of butter. Stir the batter and use a large spoon or ladle to pour a couple of tablespoons of batter onto the skillet. Swirl it around so it forms a thin layer on the bottom of the pan. When the top is dry, after about a minute, then flip it and cook the other side for about 15 to 30 seconds. It should be only very slightly brown and not crispy. Do not freak out if you screw up the first one or several, even pros mess up this fickle chemistry.  Just try again!

Put the filling in the bottom third, and use a spatula/your fingers (it only burns a little, totally worth it) to roll it up. Then slide it off and keep it in a warm oven. Put more butter on the pan, pat yourself on the back, and start the next one. You rock! Now go casually drop your crepe-making skills into conversation and watch your dates pile up.

 

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May 22, 2011

A Delicious Meal of Potatoes and Righteousness

Potatoes:

  • 5-6 potatoes, in very thin slices
  • 3 mushrooms, chopped small
  • chives, finely cut
  • ramps, finely sliced
  • green garlic, minced
  • shallot, minced
  • Parmesan cheese
  • olive oil
  • salt & pepper
  • drizzle of heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons butter

  1. Cook the ramps, mushrooms, garlic, shallot, chives, nutmeg, salt and pepper in olive oil and set aside.
  2. Peel and boil the potatoes until mostly cooked, then julienne them.
  3. Layer the potatoes and the mushroom herb mixture in a Dutch oven and top with butter and Parmesan.
  4. Bake covered at 350 for 45 minutes
  5. Serve with delicious righteous kale recipe from The Closet Dweller’s Reign, except without the pasta.
May 7, 2011

Mid Spring White Pizza

This awesome pizza was very easy to make (assuming you don’t mind making pizza dough) and was a perfect way to enjoy some of our new fresh herbs.  Here’s the recipe:

Chives, fresh garlic, garlic clove, spinach, portobello mushrooms, olive oil, parmesan, and mozzarella

  1. Cut a small handful of chives into 1/4 inch pieces (a pair of scissors works well for this) and place into a small saucepan with a little less than 1/4 cup of olive oil.  You should have about 1/3 cup of chives.  Then add 1 head of finely chopped cured garlic and cook on low heat for 10 minutes, stirring almost constantly to prevent burning.
  2. Roll out the pizza dough and spread the garlic-chive oil over the dough evenly.
  3. Spread a layer of fresh spinach, 1 finely sliced stalk of green garlic, and 4 portobello mushrooms, cut into 1 inch pieces.
  4. Top with mozzarella and grated parmesan.
  5. Cook at 425 for about 15 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, heat tomato sauce in the same pan the garlic chive oil was in to flavor it.
  7. Serve the pizza with tomato dipping sauce on the side.
  8. Rejoice.

April 13, 2011

In Which The Closet-Dweller Goes It Alone

A door creaks open in a central New York Apartment on a blustery April day. A trembling, blinking creature emerges from the dark recesses within, moving slowly into the harsh afternoon light, a la The Beast of Disney fame. Who is this pale and disheveled form, you ask, wearing a bewitching mix of leggings and marinara-stained t-shirt with mismatched socks, inquiring of the cat as to the time?

It is I, the closet-dweller. I, who revels in the dark embrace of the closet by day and gazes, hypnotized, at glowing screens by night. I, who wrangles toddlers and recycles all those beer bottles whose labels I have not torn off in a frenzy of unused energy. I, who provides almost no monetary but much comedic support to my steadfast and lovely roommates. And where, you might ask, are these providers of vegetable knowledge, givers of gentle prodding into the warmth of the kitchen? Whither, they not of the closet?

My fellow denizens of small-town America have fled to England, leaving me to face alone the yawning cupboards empty of onions and greens and the anxiety-producing prospect of a solo farmer’s market. But I will not quaver! For they have also left me to indulge pleasant pastimes: Washing the dishes in one’s underwear whilst belting hits of the lovesick-country variety. Feeling no compunction about eating ice cream for breakfast. Talking to the cat freely in his natural tongue.

So I will press on, knowing as I do the shadowy contours of the apartment, the insomniac secrets of its culinary abundance. Join me, on this journey of discovery and peril, of fear and opportunity, as I leave the closet and prepare to fend for myself.

Tonight’s adventure involves pasta, mushrooms, butter, three-buck chuck, and the musical stylings of Ms. Dolly Parton. Let’s begin:

You might want to start by tying a red ribbon around your ponytail and clearing away some dishes, while listening to this song.

Ponder the contents of your fridge while you do so, and the big questions, such as, why exactly is food at the bottom of the drain so much less appealing than food on a plate? What does the mime in Dolly’s video symbolize? Where can I find those suspenders she’s wearing?

Congratulations. You have earned your first glass of wine. This can be consumed while cutting up some garlic and if you’re me, your second-to-last shallot. Chopping can be soothing but also boring, so you should listen to this awesome song. I give you my full permission to dance around singing the chorus into a wooden spoon, as I know you want to. Go on. If you can’t be undignified and cliche in front of your cat, you’re depriving an animal of the chance to harshly judge your melodramatics, and what kind of responsible pet owner would do that? Think of the animals!

If twangy, confusing, and unrequited love is not your thing (and if not, why not?) this is also a good opportunity to call someone you love but who lingers on the phone, as one: you have wine, and two: you can say, “I would love to talk some more, but I have to put these shallots and garlic onto the stove in a frying pan with a shitload of butter and salt and pepper. Goodnight!” (See what I did there? Subtle recipe instructions!)

Now, on to the improvisation portion of the meal. While the shallots and garlic are making sweet love to all that butter, fill a pot with water and set out the pasta of your choice. (I find it satisfying to methodically rip off the top of the box, but to each her own.) Cut up a hefty portion of portobello mushrooms. Throw those in with the other stuff. Here is where my night got tricky. I decided to be bold and go for a creamy sauce even though I had no cream. You could also take this recipe in the direction of the tomato-y balsamic if you have access to such things. What I did is perhaps unconventional, but turned out, well, let’s be honest, pretty ok: tear up some cheddar cheese (white, extra sharp, just like yours truly, heyo) and pour in the heaviest liquid dairy you posses, but not sour cream or yogurt, obviously. You want to keep the liquid in proportion with how much you chopped and how much pasta you’re making. With that in mind: pour a little bit of the wine from your glass into the pan but much more into your mouth. I also put some vegetable stock in there, cause it was in the fridge, and my mushrooms were a little withered and I thought it would perk them up. And yes, I realize this recipe is just to put a little of all your dairy products over pasta and mushrooms and eat it, but sue me. I’ve been living in a closet for six months.

I know you’re as smart as you are pretty, so you’ve remembered to cook and drain your pasta during all the above innovative saucing. Mix all the stuff you’ve cooked together and put a bunch of stuff on it: salt, pepper,  more cheese. And pour another glass of wine. You deserve it.  And let me know how it turned out. For me, it was sort of weird, but I liked it. That’s what she said. Closet-dweller out!

 

Stuff On Pasta, With Cat

I took a shitty picture with my phone. You can just see the cat and the beer bottles in the background.

March 22, 2011

Portobello-Layered Mashed Potatoes

Whilst constructing a futon (care of our closet-dweller’s generous aunt), we also made this wonderful supper: Portobello-Layered Mashed Potatoes. This recipe was distributed by the folks who run our local farmers’ market and originally written by www.cookinglight.com.

Ingredients:

6 medium German butterball potatoes (or Yukon Golds – but baking potatoes will work, too)
¾ cup milk
At least 1 teaspoon salt
¼ tsp ground nutmeg
1 ½ tablespoons butter
4 shallots (or 2 onions)
5-6 garlic cloves, minced
About 6 portobello mushrooms (appx 3 cups), chopped
2 tablespoons dried basil
At least 1 tablespoon olive oil
¼ cup grated fresh Parmesan cheese
½ teaspoon paprika
A sprinkling of fresh (frozen) parsley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directions:

Place potatoes in a saucepan, and cover with water; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 30 minutes or until tender; drain, reserving 1/2 cup cooking liquid. Mash the potatoes with a fork – keep some texture. Add reserved cooking liquid, milk, 3/4 teaspoon salt, nutmeg, and 1/8 teaspoon pepper, and stir it around until just mixed.

Melt butter in a medium nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic, and sauté 2 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook 2 minutes, without stirring. Cook until liquid almost evaporates (about 4 minutes), stirring frequently. Remove from heat, and stir in 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper, and basil.

Preheat oven to 375°.

Spread one-third of potato mixture in bottom of an 8-inch square baking dish or 2-quart casserole dish coated with olive oil. Spread half of the mushroom mixture over potato mixture; repeat layers, ending with potato mixture. Sprinkle top with cheese and paprika; drizzle with oil. Bake at 375° for 25 minutes.

We found that it needed extra salt and pepper, along with a bit of butter stirred into our individual portions.

March 7, 2011

Pizza dough recipe

We’ve been making pizza every few weeks since it requires relatively few veggies and is consistently delicious.  Over the  weeks I have tested both  Mark Bittman’s pizza recipe and my own personal one.  Ultimately we all agreed on my recipe: it is more diverse and always wonderful.  It also doesn’t require a food processor.

My pizza recipe was given to me in 2005 when I lived with friends of my parents in London.  They were both great cooks and passed on tidbits of their knowledge to me.  So, scrawled into a handbound notebook six years ago, I have this fail-safe recipe:

  • Make a sponge of the following:

1/4 cup lukewarm water
2 teaspoons active dry yeast
1/4 rye or whole wheat flour

  • 2. Let is rise for 20-30 minutes
  • Stir in the rest:

1/2 cup water (also lukewarm)
1 tablespoon milk
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 3/4 cups flour
(Note: if you do 100% whole wheat flour, add 1/4 teaspoon extra yeast in the first stage)

  • Carefully oil your dough all over and place it in a bowl.  Let it rise for 2 hours in a warm place with a cloth over the top.
  • Punch down lightly and let it rise another 40 minutes
  • Finally, knead gently for a few minutes, roll out into desired shape and place on a oiled and floured baking pan.  Bake at a very high temperature until slightly golden-brown.

Some topping ideas for mid-late winter:

Mushrooms

onions

raw garlic

arugula

This weekend a friend from college was here visiting (and here snowed in for the night…just because we had a few days relief in the mid-40s doesn’t mean winter is over) and we made a mushroom onion pizza with small garlic chunks. When she arrived for dinner last night-the pizza dough rising on the counter-it had only just started to rain; however, by the time we’d eaten dinner and sat down to watch The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus (2009) it was snowing heavily and we decided our friend should spend the night.  Of the Imaginarium: a wonderful movie with an unexpected ending.  It could have done with a few more exposition scenes to help smooth the narrative shifts, but overall very enjoyable.  Beautifully shot and designed.

This morning it is still snowing heavily and the word from the fine people who have actually left the apartment this morning is that the snow is at least two feet deep.

February 6, 2011

Portobello Mushroom Paninis

In honor of our first winter’s Portobellos:

Arugula, fresh mozzarella, raw garlic, onion, balsamic vinegar and, of course, Portobello mushrooms.